Anne River meets the Ocean

Anne river

This is my last blog post about Anne river. Here she is, on her final run to the Ocean. All the way from Dunhill, through the yellow Iris and Buttercup fields.

cows

Her waters are so clear that I spotted a school of young fish feeding on something invisible.

fish

fish

Final destination – Annestown beach. It is where Anne River meets the Ocean.

sea

annestown

First I climb the eastern edge of the cliff, but I don’t walk any further – I think this part is quite dangerous to walk.

annes1

I sit down in the soft grass and enjoy what I see. Thrift (Armeria maritima) is blooming in early June, and it is the most beautiful part of the scenery.

annv 013

annv 059

I cross the beach and walk to the western edge, where cliff walking is safer. I have taken many photographs but it is impossible to share everything in this blog. One of the little pleasures was taking photographs of many flowers I came across.

flowers

I found some big, sturdy daisies that looked a bit like the Seaside daisy but not exactly.

flowers

I also found a single flower of Gladiolus.

flowers

This is the view from the western edge. If you click on the photograph to enlarge it, you will see a stony structure in the end of the beach. It is the remains of a lime kiln. Limestone was heated there until it crumbled, and was then used for fertilising the land.

annestown beach

There are many magnificent rocks and cliffs and welcoming coves down there.

cove

It is where I turned back: I didn’t like that crumbling sandy slope. It is the Ballydowane cove.

annestown

Back in Annestown, there are two donkeys – the most photographed donkeys in the area. I am not sure if they are the same donkeys I see every year – they must be not. Life of a donkey is harsh and unpredictable.

donkeys

As I was talking to them and rubbing their ears and heads, I though about the generations of donkeys that have lived in this old paddock over the years, or may be, centuries. They have never seen beautiful Anne River valley that lies just a quarter of mile down the hill from them, with its lush grasses and clean, transparent waters.

donkey

Thank you for walking with me through these three blog posts along the Anne River!

inese_mj_photographyHave a wonderful weekend!

 

113 comments

  1. I love thrift and that small clump with the blurred sea in the background is lovely. I’ve tried to grow it in my garden but I don’t think the soil is sandy enough so it only lasts for a year or two.
    Your second fish shot is fantastic; those fish are lucky the water is so clean. Thanks for the tour.

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  2. This is spellbinding. Everything looks so unpolluted. I’ve never seen such a large shoal of fish. Absolutely love the white cattle and the donkeys. Thanks for taking us on that journey. I’ve relished the beauty of it from beginning to end.

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    1. Thank you so much! It is wonderful to find such an unspoiled place. When I go there next time, I will definitely feel your presence behind my back, dear Monster 😉

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    1. Thank you so much, Robin! I wouldn’t walk there in the bad weather though 🙂 Sometimes the path comes too close to the cliff edge, and your feet sink in the cushion of soft grass. xx

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      1. No, don’t risk a fall to capture a photograph! 🙂 Your safety is very much on my mind when I see decaying castles and flowers on edges of cliffs! Blessings sent your way, friend!

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  3. How I did sigh at the beauty of this walk I took with you. Once again you have taken my breath away. So stunning, I swear I heard the waves and even the insects buzz. Now I want to come and see all this for myself. xxxxxxxxx

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  4. What a beautiful grand finale of a wonderful blog-series, Inese!!! 🙂 You´re pictures are simply magnificent! Love the flowers, love the donkeys (always felt a special relationship with those animals;) ) and the land-/seascapes are just amazing – those coves simply need to get explored 😉 What a wonderful walk you must had! Wish I could have come with you 🙂 Have a lovely sunday! xxxxxxx ❤

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  5. I loved the photographs, Inese, particularly the ones of the fish. I enlarged the photograph of the beach to have a look at the old kiln. It’s nice to have interesting bits of history still lying about. I’d like to walk along the beach myself, but I don’t think I’d paddle in it like that mother was doing with her kids. My feet are not big fans of cold water and always give me a hard time if I put them in it. 🙂

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    1. Thank you so much, Bun! The kiln is not photogenic and I didn’t take a separate picture of it, but thought I would mention it for the history’s sake. This summer the water was surprisingly pleasant, and some days even warm! I too wouldn’t let my kids that deep – I walked along the edge just ankle-deep, which was great enough 🙂

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  6. The backdrop of the water with the tall grasses was just…oh, and those thrift just made me sigh achingly for a trip to Ireland NOW. The colors are so strong here, so clear. Everything’s so defined, and pulls me in for a walk through your perception. A feat, dear friend, a most beautiful feat.

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  7. Here we have a donkey bossed around by two rather nasty Shetland ponies…seems to me you have it rather better for those of your own. A wonderful walk through a lovely land without having to walk it!

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    1. Thank you for joining me for this walk! Anne River is one of my favorites because of the delightful valley it flows through. It is sad that the ponies bossy around the poor donkey. If he had a companion, he would be happier and more confident.

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  8. A gorgeous post, Inese.
    Feel so fortunate to be able to go to Annestown most days. Its beauty has haunted me since I was a tot. Just back from a swim in nearby Garrarus. So calm this evening. How lucky we are to be surrounded by all this!

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  9. Some of those sandy cliffs did look treacherous, but the beach and coves are lovely, and there’s something very appealing to me, about little flowers growing out of a stone crack. This has been a very nice series of posts, Inese Thank you!

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    1. Thank you so much, Cynthia! I did feel uneasy walking so close to the cliff edge. The cliffs actually can crumble… My feet were sinking in the grass – as if I walked on a different planet 🙂 It was somewhat surreal and very exciting. Only when I saw the sandy slopes I realised how dangerous such walk can be.

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  10. Oh, thank you for taking us along via your photos! What view at the end where the river meets the ocean. The thrifts are gorgeous! And so many great images – I had to go back and visit more than once. You are a brave climber!

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  11. No Inese, thank *you* for bringing us with you. What glorious views! It was as if I drank up your photos, so thirsty was I for peaceful, calming scenes. You captured the sparkling crystal waters so well. Perfection. Mega hugs my friend. 🙂 ⭐

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    1. Thank you so much, Teagan! Sometimes a calming scene is exactly what we need. Anne River is rather a tiny stream than a river, but she does have a calming effect, and brings joy.

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