Month: May 2015

A look through the Waterford Crystal

waterford crystal

I see them every day – soaking wet, miserable groups of tourists trudging up the Henrietta Street in the direction of the best  known  tourist attraction in Ireland: the House of  Waterford Crystal. This post is dedicated to them. In this post I share the images I took yesterday, and the ones that are ten years old. But first the story.

In 1674 George Ravenscroft discovered the technique of adding lead oxide to the silica mixture used to make glass. This resulted in a new type of glass with great clarity which melted easier and could be blown, shaped and cut. There is no uniform definition of “crystal”, but in European Union, the glass products containing at least 24% of lead oxide may be referred to as “lead crystal”, and the products containing less lead (or other metal) oxide are called “crystal glass”.

A number of glass factories were established in Ireland in the 1700’s, mostly on the east coast close to ports since the glass making process required a constant and ready supply of coal.

The glass made at this time was quite similar in style to the cut crystal we know today and in fact, some of the patterns used then are still used in modern ranges.

In 1783 the Penrose brothers established a glass manufactory in Waterford city. It is not related to the modern Waterford Crystal company, but somehow is usually claimed to be a part of its history. Anyway, the Penroses invited a great glass manufacturer of Stourbridge  – Mr. John Hill, who had taken with him the best set of workmen he could get, and who knew the secrets of mixing the glass materials. The business flourished. After a few years John Hill left Waterford, and after that the factory had been having its ups and downs, but kept struggling decade after decade until it ceased production in 1851. A whole century there was no glass production in Waterford.

The history of modern Waterford Crystal starts in 1947 when a Czech glass manufacturer Karel (Charles) Bacik emigrated to Ireland and settled in Waterford. In partnership with a Dublin gift-shop owner Bernard Fitzpatrick, he started Waterford Glass. They persuaded a great glass craftsman Miroslav Havel to join them. Havel recruited skilled craftspeople from traditional glassmaking areas of Europe, set up training and apprenticeship programs for Irish personnel, and designed new product ranges. He visited the National Museum and made drawings from the collections of original Penrose Waterford Glass. The factory progressed and made its first profits in 1955.

During the 1960’s and 1970’s demand for Waterford Crystal went up dramatically. The factory was doing great through the 1980’s but started experiencing financial problems in 1990’s. The last and the greatest success was the 6-foot diametric crystal ball made in the factory – the Times Square New Years Eve Millennium Ball that was lowered down the pole during the New Year 2000 countdown. Ironically, it started the Waterford Crystal’s countdown: Waterford Crystal Manufacturing ceased to exist in Waterford city in January 2009. The brand is now co-owned by a US venture capital company KPS, Wedgewood and Royal Doulton (WWRD). In 2010 a new tourism-oriented manufacturing facility and retail outlet reopened in Waterford. The facility offers guided factory tours.

These images are taken in 2005 at the old Waterford Crystal factory workshops.

Waterford Crystal

A glass-blower in action.

Waterford Crystal

Waterford Crystal

Waterford Crystal

The glass is ready for the cutting process. The first vase from the left still has the top to be cut off.

Waterford Crystal

The markings show the future pattern.

Waterford Crystal

In the master’s hands the glass becomes a piece of art.

Waterford Crystal

Waterford Crystal

Waterford Crystal

I was very impressed with this artwork: the girl and the road are cut on the opposite sides of the vase creating a 3D effect.

Waterford Crystal

This sad St. Patrick is a very popular design.

Waterford Crystal

One of the trophy bowls.

Waterford Crystal

This one-horse carriage from 2005 is remarkably upgraded:

Waterford Crystal

its 2015  version –  in the image  below.

Waterford Crystal

The prices are also “upgraded” : this carriage will cost you 30.000 Euro.

The entrance and reception desk at the House Of Waterford Crystal today.

Waterford Crystal

The place is always busy with tourists.

Waterford Crystal

Elaborated chandeliers reflected in the ceiling mirror.

Waterford Crystal

Crystal and silverware on display.

Waterford Crystal

They are still making these funny things, but the prices are very serious – 15.000-30.000 a piece.

Waterford Crystal

There are lots of Christmasy designs, and no discounts, regardless of the season. I think this vase looks very neat.

Waterford Crystal

This was my favorite: the window frame and the room interior are cut on the opposite sides of the vase ( the same as the girl and the road, ten years ago).

Waterford Crystal

I also loved these two  – a vase and a bowl.

Waterford Crystal

The seahorse is a trademark of Waterford Crystal designed  by Mr. Havel himself.  The harp is another trademark that is slowly replacing the seahorse in the recent years. This one can  be  bought for 40.000 Euros.

Waterford Crystal

After you make a purchase, your artwork of choice can get engraved.

Waterford Crystal

There is another small company set up by the former Waterford Crystal glassmakers – The Irish Handmade Glass Co. It is situated at the Kite Design Studio, Henrietta Street, Waterford. Visitors are welcome to watch the crystal masters at work with no charge.

kite studios

The tourists returning from the House of Waterford Crystal seldom stop here.  Some of them stubbornly walk through the rain to the Reginald Tower, but majority hurry down the street to the dry haven of their hotel rooms.  Tourism in Ireland can be challenging…

Instead of a song, I am posting a video reportage that takes you back in time. For Waterford Crystal, it was a triumph of fame.


IneseMjPhotographyHave a great week!

Simple things

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In Grafton Street, Dublin, you never get bored: an army of street performers takes care of your entertainment. Stationed along the path, they do their best to impress the by-passers and earn some cash. Grafton street is only 180 m long and 6 m wide, but that afternoon at least nine talented performers gathered crowds and made the street lively providing all sort of amusements.

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ireland

The biggest and the most happily looking crowd surrounded a young couple creating giant soap bubbles.

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ireland

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Simplicity and magic of their performance was truly fascinating.

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The little ones ran around catching the bubbles; the grown-ups just stood there, staring in awe.

Simple things. What our life would look like without them?

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Cuteness of a baby animal; a delicate flower…

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… a green leaf…

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… a barley spikes moving in the wind…

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“If the sight of the blue skies fills you with joy, if a blade of grass springing up in the fields has power to move you, if the simple things of nature have a message that you understand, rejoice, for your soul is alive.”  – Italian actress Eleonora Duse 

Even successful relationships are based on accumulation of the simple things that people do together.  Simple like that.

One of my favorites – Zero 7 and their album Simple Things.

Zero 7 –  Simple Things 

IneseMjPhotographyHave a great weekend!

Mountain Grove

Ireland

One of my first WordPress posts was the one about Jenkinstown Woods. Now, after a year, I am visiting another bluebell forest, Mountain Grove – a loop trail just outside Piltown, Co Kilkenny.

Mountain Grove is an old woodland part of Piltown forest that is located in South West Kilkenny, covering an area of 1,823 hectares. The forest stretches to the Tipperary border on the west and to the Waterford border on the south, along  the river Suir. The main tree species growing in the forest include Sitka spruce, larch, Douglas fir, beech, ash and oak, with the broadleaves dominating in Mountain Grove – as you can see in the images.

Starting off from the tiny parking spot, I meet two dog walkers and from this moment I am there alone for a whole two hours.

Ireland

The quietness is almost surreal. The birds are nesting and prefer not to expose themselves, and I don’t see any presence of the mammals either – dogs have scared them away from the grove.

Ireland

The bluebells are scarce but nevertheless their fragrance is intense, sweet and alluring. I walk off the trail and feel like I disappear from the world and become a part of the wild woodland.

Ireland

Ireland

Ireland

Ireland

Ireland

Ireland

The Early purple orchid, once a common plant, is a rare guest in the woodlands. Many wild orchids are legally protected, but this fact does not stop people from picking them… A friend went to the Mountain Grove just three days later and didn’t find a single flower – all gone. People don’t realize that it takes years for the orchids to germinate.

The early purple orchid is the “long purple” of Ophelia’s garland, as referred to by Gertrude in Shakespeare’s Hamlet:

“Of crow-flowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples, that liberal shepherds give a grosser name”

Ireland

Different species of Ferns started unrolling their young fronds. In the image below – Hart’s tongue fern (Asplenium scolopendrium).

Ireland

And of course there is a beautiful yet nameless stream.

Ireland

Ireland

I will be back!

Ireland

Hope you enjoyed the woodlands.

inesemjphotographyHave a happy week!

Light, Water and Firmament

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It is raining all the week: even the birds don’t want to sing any more.  Everything is soaked with water.  “Let’s there be light!”… There is no light, and the days a grey from morning to dusk.  Not that I complain. It is a good enough time for photography.

gorsemonores

sheepres

I stop my car and take some pictures. Suddenly the hail storm begins, and in a blink of an eye the hailstones cover the front seat and dashboard while I am frantically scrolling the car window up.  The hailstones are melting in my hands…  My “models” run away. Oh well..

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All the way across the pass, driving down to Clonmel, Tipperary, I had the voice of Lisa Gerrard in my head.  As far as I could see, there was not a single human around. Low, heavy clouds and distant blue mountain tops; ravines filled with fog … This place is right for me.

I chose this video for my post – Gregory Colbert‘s study of interactions between humans and animals, and a beautiful song The Host of Seraphim by Dead Can Dance.

Now we walk down to the sea.

 

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The sand trees are as fascinating as the frost flowers on the window glass.

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Is it a message? I have a sinking and sobering feeling that there are countless messages of a great importance that we either miss or cannot read.

Lisa Gerrard –  Seven Seas From  album ‘Twilight Kingdom’

inesemjphotography Have a peaceful weekend!